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Pyscodog
Reply with quote  #1 
I bought a Remmy LTR/223, used. It has a few issues, but got most of those worked out. So far, I've tried 52,55,60,69, grain bullets and get 3/4 to 1 inch groups. This is using Benchmark,Varget,335, and 322 powders. I have heard the LTR's in 223 are pretty finicky about what you feed them, is this true? I'm starting to think I have a barrel problem, but not sure. Any comments, suggestions? I am in need of a helping hand here. I can't really afford to rebarrel at this time, and feel as though there is a load out there that will work. I know, MOA is pretty good, I just feel the rifle should do better.
Thanks-pyscodog
Johnboy
Reply with quote  #2 
hello,just keep trying.I like the 55gNBT with 27.5g of varget in the lands.my new 223 is a 1:9 twist and I've been testing with it,and I have loaded a number of weight's and powders.and for a new rifel and very little time to test my best so fare is with 4007,75g vld,and a cci 450 with the bullet in the lands.just keep adding and takeing 1/2 a grain at a time along with long and short oals and you should get it.remember it can get tough and mind boggeling at times.most of my data comes from nosler and hogdens web site.
Johnboy
30378
Reply with quote  #3 
Mine loves 69gr Sierras with 25gr of Varget, neck sized Lapua brass with Fed 205 primers and an OAL of 2.305". Might give it a try. A Jewell trigger and good optics are also great accuacy enhancements.
Klong
Reply with quote  #4 
Be sure your front screw is tight and the rear screw is just snug. Have you bedded the stock? It may need at least a skin bed. I do not own the 223, but my 308 shoots very well.
Ole
Reply with quote  #5 
The .223 LTR I just bought a few weeks ago really likes the 55gr Sierra Blitzking and VV N-135 powder. But, I have primer flow around the firing pin like crazy no matter what the load, so the bolt is going to Gretan to get the firing pin bushed.

Ole
tazzman
Reply with quote  #6 
Pyscodog,

Not knowing the specifics of your rifle, I am going draw on basics.
Do you know your COAL (cartridge overall length) when touching the lands? I use re-sized and unprimed brass with a slot cut in the neck shoulder. I then hand seat a bullet and the gently chamber the round. The touchy part is when you want to extract the built-up dummy round without moving the bullet. I keep my fingers on the brass to prevent the ejector from doing its job, namely flinging the brass out of the action. After having successfully removed the dummy round, I then measure the COAL. Remember, this is only good for this specific bullet. I then build up another dummy, without the cut slot, and try the round at the measured COAL for chambering and magazine feeding issues. After adapting the COAL to correct the issues, I then figure out a mid-range powder load. I then build up 5 rounds at COAL. I then build up 5 rounds at COAL -.003 in. Again at COAL -.006 in. The extent of this load exercise and reduction in length for me is realistically down to COAL as described in the reference books.
Shooting starts with a clean rifle and I shoot 5 fouling shots.
I dry-swab the bore after those shots. I shoot the first load (COAL), dry-swab, cool the rifle. Records of group size, case condition must be kept. You will notice that the group size will change as you shoot, some combinations will be good, some not. I have found that group size usually starts out average, will reduce in size, will again enlarge and the again reduce. I understand from this that barrel harmonics are the deciding factor. I have taken the load that shows the reduction in group size the second time to be the most promising. Once you have figured out which COAL your rifle likes best, then you can start playing with varying powder loads.
This may be long and dry but I've found out that this method, using the same powder load and differing bullet seating depths to figure out the best starting combination, actually saves time because you only change one parameter at a time.

Keep us informed of your progress,

Tazzman
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