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skeetlee
Reply with quote  #9 
what is causing the case to seperate? Lee
Preacher
Reply with quote  #10 
Usually it's a headspace problem that causes it.........
NorCalMikie
Reply with quote  #11 
and or overworked brass. Been full length resized too many times and pushing the shoulder back more than needed.
Fire, measure, bump shoulder back about .001 or .002, reload and go shoot something.
fdshuster
Reply with quote  #12 
Everything NorCalMikie said and before starting to load the brass, check carefully for the bright ring that usually will start to appear just above the base. If you see it, check it with a sharp pointed piece of bent wire. If you can feel the tip of the wire "fall into" a groove, do not reload that case.
NorCalMikie
Reply with quote  #13 
I've never had a case head seperation on my 6 BR. And some of it has been reloaded at least 10 times if not more.
The less you move that brass, the longer it will last.
Now my M1A? That's a different story!
fdshuster
Reply with quote  #14 
NorCalMikie: My experience also. Never even seen the bright "starting" ring on 6ppc, 22BR, and 6BR, all Lapua of course, and many of them are in the high 20's for number of times reloaded. Even my Winchester 223 brass used in my AR's will get the small split in the neck, after 13 or 14 reloads, and are thrown away before the ring ever appears. Have had impending seperation, with the beginning of the bright ring, verified with the sharp point, on a few Winchester 22-250 after 6 and 7 reloads, so they went into the scrap can immediately. My "solution" to the problem is control headspace length, and inspect the cases before each reloading. Some rounds, like the 220 Swift have a reputation for seperation ( and maybe the 22-250 also?), so special attention/inspection may be justified for those.
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